Roster Information for the 2021-22 Offseason

I’ll pin this on the site for reference and update as necessary over the coming weeks.  Let me know if you seeanything that needs explanation or anything that looks wrong.  for instance, I had to figure options on my own.  The two sites I use for reference haven’t updated yet after the 2021 season.  And, some of their options info is wrong anyway.


A flurry of activity will begin the day after the World Series ends.  This could be as soon as October 30th but no later than November 3rd.  In any case, the morning after the series ends, eligible players get to elect free agency.  Players with options will take action or see their teams take action.

Within five days of the end of the world series (November 4-8), teams will have to make any qualifying offers (this year a QO = $18.9M) to their free agents and some transactional shuffling begins, like activation of players from the 60-man injury list (IL) and the outrighting of players off the 40-man roster.

By November 20th, the Phillies and other teams will have selected the contracts of those minor league players who are eligible for the Rule 5 Draft whom they want to protect from the draft.  The current Rule 5 rules are at the end of this post.

Below you will find all the information available to the public that the Phillies may use to make these decisions.


Current 40-Man Roster – Actually 44 since Matt Moore, JoJo Romero, Rhys Hoskins, and  Roman Quinn are still on the 60-day Injury List.  These four players have to be activated and placed according to their contracts (rostered, tendered, released, or free agent), so as many as four guys might have to come off the roster soon after the world series ends.  Optioning isn’t available.  The option period has ended.  Besides, it doesn’t create the needed openings on the 40-man roster.  Moore is a free agent, Hoskins and Quinn are arbitration eligible, and Romero is pre-arbitration.

  1. Alvarado, Jose LHP
  2. Bedrosian, Cam RHP
  3. Bradley, Archie RHP
  4. Brogdon, Connor RHP
  5. Coonrod, Sam RHP
  6. Crouse, Hans RHP
  7. Dohy, Kyle LHP
  8. Dominguez, Seranthony RHP
  9. Eflin, Zach RHP
  10. Falter, Bailey LHP
  11. Gibson, Kyle RHP
  12. Hammer, J.D. RHP
  13. Jones, Damon LHP
  14. Kennedy, Ian RHP
  15. Medina, Adonis RHP
  16. Moore, Matt LHP
  17. Morales, Francisco RHP
  18. Neris, Hector RHP
  19. Nola, Aaron RHP
  20. Romero, JoJo LHP
  21. Rosso, Ramon RHP
  22. Sanchez, Christopher LHP
  23. Suarez, Ranger LHP
  24. Wheeler, Zack RHP
  25. Knapp, Andrew C
  26. Marchan, Rafael C
  27. Realmuto, JT C
  28. Bohm, Alec 3B
  29. Galvis, Freddy SS
  30. Gregorious, Didi SS
  31. Hoskins, Rhys 1B
  32. Maton, Nick INF
  33. Segura, Jean 2B
  34. Torreyes, Ronald INF
  35. Williams, Luke INF
  36. Harper, Bryce RF
  37. Haseley, Adam OF
  38. Herrera, Odubel CF
  39. Jankowski, Travis OF
  40. McCutchen, Andrew LF
  41. Miller, Brad 1B-OF
  42. Moniak, Mickey OF
  43. Quinn, Roman CF
  44. Vierling, Matt OF

The players on the 40 (44) are in bold text in the next 5 sections.


Eight Players have Contracts in 2022

  1. Bryce Harper (13 yr/$330M (19-31)) enters the 4th year of a 13-year contract, entering his age 29 season.  2022 salary $27,538,462.  (zero change over 2021)
  2. Zack Wheeler (5 yr/$118M (20-24)) enters the 3rd year of a 5-year contract, entering age his 32 season.  2022 salary $26,000,000.  ($3.5M above 2021)
  3. JT Realmuto (5 yr/$115.5M (21-25)) enters the 2nd year of a 5-year contract, entering his age 31 season.  2022 salary $23,875,000.  ($3.875M above 2021)
  4. Jean Segura (5 yr/$70M (18-22)+23 c opt) enters the 5th year of a 5-year contract, entering his age 32 season.  2022 salary $14,850,000.  (zero change over 2021)
  5. Didi Gregorius (2 yr/$28M (21-22)) enters the 2nd year of a 2-yr contract, entering his age 32 season.  2022 salary $15,250,000.  ($2.5M above 2021)
  6. Aaron Nola (4 yr/$45M (19-22)+23 cl opt) enters the 4th year of a 4-year contract, entering his age 29 season.  2022 salary $15,500,000.  ($3.25M above 2021)
  7. Kyle Gibson (3 yr/$28M (20-22)) enters the 3rd year of a 3-year contract, entering his age 34 season.  2022 salary $7,666,667.  ($2M below 2021)
  8. Scott Kingery (6 yr/$24M (18-23)+24-26 opts) enters the 5th year of a 6-year contract, entering age 28 season.  2022 salary $6,250,000.  ($2M above 2021)

These eight players will account for $121,430,129 (more than 50% of the salary allowable below the 2021 Luxury Tax Limit).  They also represent a $13,125,000 increase over their collective 2021 salaries.  Note: the “Competitive Balance Tax Threshold” for 2022 is unknown at this time.


Two Players have Club Options for 2022

  1. Andrew McCutchen (3 yr/$50M (19-21)+22 opt) enters option year of $15,000,000 or a $3M buyout, entering his age 35 season.
  2. Odubel Herrera (5 yr/$30.5M (17-21)+22-23 opts) enters option year of $11,500,000 or a $2.5M buyout, entering his age 30 season.

If these options are declined, it represents a savings of  $30,350.000 based on their 2021 salaries.


Ten Players are Arbitration Eligible this Offseason

  1. Rhys Hoskins ($4.8M) enters 2nd of 3 arb years, entering age 29 season.
  2. Zach Eflin ($4.45M) enters 3rd of 3 arb years, entering age 28 season.
  3. Andrew Knapp ($1.1M) enters 3rd of 3 arb years, entering age 30 season.
  4. Seranthony Dominguez ($727,500) enters 2nd of 4 arb years, entering age 27 season.
  5. Jose Alvarado ($1M) enters 2nd of 3 arb years, entering age 27 season.
  6. Ronald Torreyes ($800,000) enters 2nd of 4 arb years, entering age 29 season.
  7. Travis Jankowski ($) enters 4th of 4 arb years, entering age 30 season.
  8. Adam Haseley ($578,500) enters 1st of 4 arb years, entering age 26 season.
  9. Roman Quinn ($578,000) enters 1st of 3 arb years, entering age 29 season.
  10. Ranger Suarez ($) enters 1st of 4 arb years, entering age 26 season.

MLB Trade Rumors hasn’t published their arbitration predictions.  When they do, I’ll add that information above.


Sixteen Players are Pre-Arb, One-Year Tenders this Off Season

  1. Alec Bohm (1 yr/$575,000) pre-arb, entering age 25 season.
  2. Sam Coonrod (1 yr/$573,000) pre-arb, entering age 29 season.
  3. Connor Brogdon (1 yr/$571,500) pre-arb, entering age 27 season.
  4. Hans Crouse pre-arb, entering age 23 season.
  5. Kyle Dohy pre-arb, entering age 25 season.
  6. Bailey Falter pre-arb, entering age 25 season.
  7. JD Hammer pre-arb, entering age 27 season.
  8. Damon Jones pre-arb, entering age 27 season.
  9. Rafael Marchan pre-arb, entering age 23 season.
  10. Nick Maton pre-arb, entering age 25 season.
  11. Adonis Medina pre-arb, entering age 25 season.
  12. Mickey Moniak pre-arb, entering age 24 season.
  13. Francisco Morales pre-arb, entering age 24 season.
  14. Jojo Romero pre-arb, entering age 25 season.
  15. Ramon Rosso pre-arb, entering age 26 season.
  16. Christopher Sanchez pre-arb, entering age 25 season.
  17. Matt Vierling pre-arb, entering age 25 season.
  18. Luke Williams pre-arb, entering age 25 season.

These guys are all under team control.  Minimum salaries are usually assigned in the CBA.  This only comes into play when a player is on the active, 26-man roster (Except in the case where a player has a major league contract.)


Seven Players are MLB Free Agents after the 2021 Season (six-plus years of MLB service time and not under contract)

  1. Hector Neris ($5M) enters his age 33 season.
  2. Archie Bradley ($6M) enters his age 29 season
  3. Brad Miller ($3.5M) enters his age 32 season.
  4. Matt Moore ($3M) enters his age 33 season.
  5. Ian Kennedy ($2.15M) enters his age 37 season.
  6. Cam Bedrosian ($1.5M) enters his age 30 season.
  7. Freddy Galvis ($1.5M) enters his age 32 season.

These seven guys represent $22,650,000  in salary that comes off the books.


Sixteen Players are MiLB Free Agents after the 2021 Season (1. three-plus years of MLB service time and been outrighted season, 2. outrighted multiple times in  career, and 3. unsigned and not on the 40 and have spent parts of at least seven seasons on a minor league roster or injured list.  Rule of thumb for most is a 2015 first signing and on a minor league roster that season.  Note that 2020 counts.)

  1. David Paulino
  2. Brock Stassi
  3. TJ Rivera
  4. Taylor Guerrieri
  5. Charlie Tilson
  6. Tyler Heinemen
  7. Brady Lail
  8. Grenny Cumana
  9. Aneurys Zabala
  10. Arquimedes Gamboa
  11. Daniel Brito
  12. Rodolfo Duran
  13. Mauricio Llovera
  14. Cornelius Randolph
  15. Edgar Cabral
  16. Nick Fanti

Mark Appel signed in July 2015 but his 7-year clock was interrupted after 5 years when he retired and restarted when he signed with the Phillies this season.  He will be a free agent after the 2022 season.

Seven other players signed contracts in 2015 but were not placed on rosters during the 2015 season or were signed after the 2015 season ended.

  1. Manuel Silva signed on July 7, 2015 but was not placed on a roster.
  2. Jhailyn Ortiz signed on July 9, 2015 but was not placed on a roster.
  3. Ben Pelletier signed on July 15, 2015 but was not placed on a roster.
  4. Jonathan Guzman signed on August 17, 2015 but was not placed on a roster.
  5. Jeff Singer signed on October 15, 2015 after the 2015 season was over.
  6. Joel Cesar signed on October 30, 2015 after the 2015 season was over.
  7. Leonel Aponte signed on December 1, 2015 after the 2015 season was over.

The eight contracts will undergo increases of $13,125,000 that will increase their total to $121,430,129 (and to $124,668,000 for tax purposes).

Declining the two options will save the team the $26,500,000 contracted for 2022, but is a real savings of the $30,350.000 the team was responsible for in 2021.  (I noticed last year that buyouts weren’t reported as a cost on any of the sites I follow.  I asked and was told that sincde they are paid out when the option is declined that they are lost in a limbo between CBT seasons.  So, if true, that’s $5.5M that counts against neither CBT.)

It’s very unlikely that the Phillies tender offers to all ten arbitration eligible players.  So, it’s difficult to assign any cost there.  The Phillies traditionally try to come to agreement to avoid arbitration.  Hoskins should see a nice bump.  Suarez should get a nice starting figure.  Alvarez could get a substantial raise.  I don’t know how you go about giving Dominguez a raise.  And, Eflin should also be tough to negotiate not knowing his immediate future.  Who knows how the Phillies will deal with the rest.

The pre-arbitration guys will have salaries close to the minimum assigned by the Phillies.  They will only come into play if and when they are on the active roster.

The seven free agents represent a savings of $22,650,000.  It will be interesting to see who, if any, and for how much the Phillies try to sign.

We don’t know if Scott Kingery will be able to take a spot on the active roster.  In any case, his salary is a sunk cost.  Spots 27-40 on the roster are allocated $2,250,000 for salary.  Benefits are an estimated $16,000,000 in 2022.  That puts the Phillies at $142,918,000 for CBT purposes.

Based on the 2021 CBT limit, that leaves them a little over $67M to fill 19 roster spots.  A portion of that figure will have to be allocated to cover arbitrations but will lower the spots to fill by an undetermined number.  The more players who can step up from the pre-arb group, the more money that can be spent in free agency.


Thirty-Five Players are First Year Rule 5 Eligible this Offseason

  1. Alec Bohm, 3B (on the 40-man roster)
  2. Matt Vierling, CF (on the 40-man roster)
  3. Hans Crouse, RHP (on the 40-man roster)
  4. Anton Kuznetsov, LHP
  5. Cristian Hernandez, RHP
  6. Jose Perez, RHP
  7. Wilberson Liendo, RHP
  8. Luis Gomez, RHP
  9. Hsin-Chieh Lin, RHP
  10. Ben Brown, RHP
  11. Oscar Gonzalez, C
  12. Carlos Betancourt, RHP
  13. Nick Matera, C
  14. Keylan Killgore, LHP
  15. Tom Sutera, RHP
  16. Tyler McKay, RHP
  17. Mark Potter, RHP
  18. Jonas De La Cruz, RHP
  19. Ethan Lindow, LHP
  20. D.J. Stewart, 3B
  21. Gabriel Yanez, LHP
  22. Carlos De La Cruz, OF
  23. Victor Vargas, RHP
  24. Luis Garcia, SS
  25. Ethan Evanko, LHP
  26. Colton Eastman, RHP
  27. Jack Perkins, RHP
  28. Austin Ross, RHP
  29. Taylor Lehman, LHP
  30. Madison Stokes, IF
  31. Tyler Carr, RHP
  32. Luke Miller, 3B
  33. Matt Kroon, 3B
  34. James McArthur, RHP
  35. Jack Conley, C

The first three are already on the 40-man roster.  Most of the players on this list are too far down the organization to be selected by another team.  In recent years, the Phillies have protected pitchers at the upper levels.  Luis Garcia is an interesting player eligible this year.


Thirty-Four Players are Returning Rule 5 Eligible Players this Offseason

  1. Jhailyn Ortiz, RF
  2. Simon Muzziotti, CF
  3. Zach Warren, LHP
  4. Jakob Hernandez, LHP
  5. David Parkinson, LHP
  6. Josh Stephen, LF
  7. Andrew Brown, RHP
  8. Colby Fitch, C
  9. CJ Chatham, SS
  10. Braeden Ogle, LHP
  11. Dalton Guthrie, SS
  12. Jhordany Mezquita, LHP
  13. Juan Aparacio, C
  14. Leonel Aponte, RHP
  15. Nicolas Torres, INF
  16. Jose Tortolero, INF
  17. Edgar Made, SS
  18. Manuel Silva, LHP
  19. Rodolfo Duran, C
  20. Jonathan Guzman, SS
  21. Ben Pelletier, RF
  22. Mark Appel, RHP
  23. Trevor Bettencourt, RHP
  24. Jeff Singer, LHP
  25. Darick Hall, 1B
  26. Grenny Cumana, INF
  27. Joel Cesar, RHP
  28. Edgar Cabral, C
  29. Daniel Brito, 2B
  30. Arquimedes Gamboa, SS
  31. Nick Fanti, LHP
  32. Julian Garcia, RHP
  33. Jonathan Hennigan, LHP
  34. Henri Lartigue, C
  35. Cornelius Randolph, LF

Simon Muzziotti will likely be placed back on the 40-man roster.  Maybe Jhailyn Ortiz, as well.


Guys who have options (# remaining)

  1. Aaron Nola (3)
  2. Andrew Knapp (3)
  3. Rhys Hoskins (3)
  4. Jose Alvardo (2)
  5. Connor Brogdon (2)
  6. Sam Coonrod (2)
  7. Kyle Dohy (2)
  8. Bailey Falter (2)
  9. Damon Jones (2)
  10. JoJo Romero (2)
  11. Rafael Marchan (2)
  12. Alec Bohm (2)
  13. Scott Kingery (2)
  14. NickMaton (2)
  15. Luke Williams (2)
  16. Matt Vierling (2)
  17. Seranthony Dominguez (1)
  18. Zach Eflin (1)
  19. JD Hammer (1)
  20. Mauricio Llovera (1)
  21. Ramon Rosso (1)
  22. Christopher Sanchez (1)
  23. Arquimedes Gamboa (1)
  24. Adam Haseley (1)
  25. Mickey Moniak (1)

Last Option Used This Season

  1. Adonis Medina (0)

This information is important when constructing the 40-man roster.  Not only will organizations try to protect promising young prospects, but they have to build a workable roster to compete with and support the team at the major league level.

As we have seen in the past, the Phillies will acquire new players during the offseason that will be assigned to the 40-man roster and fill spots on their major league and AAA rosters.

While the Phillies are trying to build their 40-man roster, other teams are doing the same thing.  So, it will be difficult to trade players “we don’t want” to protect.

And, finally, not protecting a player does not mean he will be selected by another organization.  And if one is, he may be returned by the selecting team.


Rule 5 Explained

Major League Rule 5 outlines baseball’s Annual Selection of Players.  Section (a) of the rule determines when the meeting takes place.  Section (b) describes the method and priority of the selections.  And section (c) defines which players are subject to selection.

When baseball conducts their winter meetings that conclude with the Rule 5 Draft, only certain players are subject to selection.  Here is MLR5(c).

(c) All players on the Minor League Reserve Lists of Major League Clubs, except players on the Voluntarily Retired, Disqualified, or Ineligible Lists shall be subject to selection by other Major League Clubs at the Rule 5 Selection Meeting in accordance with the following:

(1) A player without previous Major or Minor League service who signs with a Major League Club shall be subject to selection based on the following:

(A) if 18 years of age or under on the June 5 immediately preceding the player’s signing, the player shall be subject to selection at the fifth Rule 5 Selection Meeting that follows the signing date of the player’s first Major or Minor League contract, unless Rule 5(c)(1)(C) applies;

(B) if 19 years of age or over on the June 5 immediately preceding the player’s signing, the player shall be subject to selection at the fourth Selection Meeting that follows the signing date of the player’s first Major or Minor League contract, unless Rule 5(c)(1)(C) applies;

(C) if the signing date of a player’s first Major or Minor League contract is between

(i) the conclusion of the championship season for the Major or Minor League Club to which the player is assigned on such contract and

(ii) the next Rule 5 Selection Meeting,

then the player shall be deemed to have signed after the next Rule 5 Selection Meeting, for purposes of this Rule 5(c)(1).

(2) A player who is re-signed by a Club within one year from the date the Club released the player shall be subject to draft at the Rule 5 Selection Meeting following the date of the latest contract with that Club.

(3) A player who has been subject to draft at a Rule 5 Selection Meeting shall be subject to draft at any subsequent Rule 5 Selection Meeting if the player is on a Minor League Reserve List (filed pursuant to Rule 2 (Player Limits and Reserve Lists)) at the time of the Rule 5 Selection Meeting.

(4) A player

(A) whose contract has been assigned outright by a Major League Club to a Minor League Club,

(B) who has been signed as a free agent to a Minor League Uniform Player Contract for services in the following year and is otherwise subject to selection pursuant to Rule 5(c)(1) or Rule 5(c)(2), or

(C) who has been released unconditionally from a Minor League roster and is otherwise subject to selection pursuant to Rule 5(c)(1) or Rule 5(c)(2),

shall be subject to selection at any subsequent Rule 5 Selection Meeting if the player is on a Minor League Reserve List (filed pursuant to Rule 2 (Player Limits and Reserve Lists)) at the time of the Rule 5 Selection Meeting.

(5) A Major League or independent Minor League Club may designate any player on one of its Minor League Reserve Lists to be subject to selection who otherwise would not be selectable under this Rule 5.


Roster size for the 2022 season will likely remain at 26 players.  It will be interesting to see if MLB decides to revert back to their pre-2020 season agreement that pitchers be limited to 13 of those slots.

 

 

25 thoughts on “Roster Information for the 2021-22 Offseason

  1. The increases in salary (or decreases in the case of Gibson) from 2021 to 2022 for the eight players with long term contracts have no impact whatsoever on the Phillies luxury tax. For luxury tax purposes, what is used is the average annual value (AAV) of the contract. So for luxury tax purposes in 2022:

    Harper: $25,384,615 (same as 2021)
    Wheeler: $23,600,000 (same as 2021)
    Kingery: $4,000,000 (same as 2021)

    Etc., etc. So the eight contracts have about $111 million AAV, which is what is used for the luxury tax calculation.

    1. $ 27,385,000,Harper (COTS rounds up from $25,384,615)
      $ 23,600,000 Wheeler
      $ 23,100,000 Realmuto
      $ 14,000,000 Segura
      $ 14,000,000 Gregorius
      $ 11,250,000 Nola
      $ 9,333,333 Gibson
      $ 4,000,000 Kingery
      $124,668,000 Salaries AAV against tax
      $ 2,250,000 the 14 40-man players not on the active roster
      $ 16,000,000 estimated player benefits
      $142,918,000 payroll for CBT

      Now, I said,
      1.) “The eight contracts will undergo increases of $13,125,000 that will increase their total to $121,430,129 (and to $124,668,000 for tax purposes).” and
      2.) “We don’t know if Scott Kingery will be able to take a spot on the active roster. In any case, his salary is a sunk cost. Spots 27-40 on the roster are allocated $2,250,000 for salary. Benefits are an estimated $16,000,000 in 2022. That puts the Phillies at $142,918,000 for CBT purposes.”
      3.) and “Based on the 2021 CBT limit, that leaves them a little over $67M to fill 19 roster spots. A portion of that figure will have to be allocated to cover arbitrations …”.

      You may not like the wording, by my numbers are right. Your 111M is wrong. I don’t know how you arrived at that number. Next time maybe show ALL your work. I spent a lot of time on this. I don’t appreciate the first comment misleading my readers with wrong information.

      1. Oh, and the AAV for just those eight contracts could go up since the Phillies would only be responsible for the portion of the 2021 season when Gibson’s salary was on their books. It could go up for 2022 when the actual AAV for the full contract is used.

      2. Sorry, my mistake. I added the Cot’s top contracts (rows 10-16 of their spreadsheet, which add up to $111 million), and they don’t have Gibson on there, and Kingery is listed below. So you are correct.

  2. I think that was why they gave Harper the extra years to lower his AAV for luxury tax purposes. They do it in hockey all the time since they have the hard cap. Dropping that AAV is vital but the trade off is that AAV is kicked down the road a couple of years at the end when your ROI is decreased sometimes dramatically, Pujols being prime example.

  3. Cutch (3 yr/$50M (19-21)+22 opt) enters option year of $15,000,000 or a $3M buyout, entering his age 35 season.
    Odubel (5 yr/$30.5M (17-21)+22-23 opts) enters option year of $11,500,000 or a $2.5M buyout, entering his age 30 season.
    If these options are declined, it represents a savings of $30,350.000 based on their 2021 salaries.

    I thought the savings would be $21M…..the buy-outs, totaling $5.5M vs their total salaries in 2022 of $26.5M, count against the lux.tax.
    And then for Odubel in 2023….$1M buy-out against the threshold.

    1. I wrote the guy who does COTS and asked about the buyouts for Robertson and Phelps last year ($2.25M combined) when they didn’t show up on this year’s spreadsheet. Here’s the reply.

      “The buyouts for Robertson and Phelps were paid in October or November 2020, when the club declined their options. Those amounts were part of each deal’s guarantee, so they were carried on the Phillies’ books for the guaranteed years of the deal: 2020 (Phelps) and 2019-20 (Robertson). Had the Phillies exercised either option, they would have received a credit for the unpaid buyout which they could have chosen to apply to 2020 or 2021.”

      I don’t know if this helps, but it’s why I didn’t try to apply the buyouts as savings or count them against the CBT.

      1. Ok..thanks Jim.
        I guess the assumption is that they probably do the same standard procedure with all their contracts that have those option buy-outs attached

  4. Has anyone heard any update on Daniel Brito? Wondering if he’ll ever able to resume playing ever again, very sad as he was having a breakout year.

      1. Thanks. I understand them asking for privacy regarding the details as I’ve gone through similar things with family members. My guess though from that is that his career as a player might be over but I hope he comes back to the game in some other capacity.

    1. Keep Janko over Roman.
      Doobie probably gets the buy-out.
      Knapp….????
      All the rest seem to be keepers at those salaries..

      1. -Odubel is bought out.
        -Jankowski is on borrowed time. He’ll be here if they don’t have better options.
        -Eflin is an easy yes. He’s solid 3 when he’s on – he’s worth that salary.
        -Knapp will be replaced by Marchan. There’s nothing Knapp did that Marchan couldn’t do for less money. He’ll have to develop his hitting in the majors. Oh well.
        -Alvarado will probably be signed, but he could easily be traded – we’ll see.
        -Hoskins is a no brainer.
        -Torreyes stays because Girardi loves him and, in his defense, he’s very clutch.
        -Seranthony – you’ve to keep him. The upside is too good to ignore.
        -Roman Quinn is done here.

        1. I don’t agree, I expect Knapp back and I think Marchan will be traded for a relief arm or part of a deal for an OF.

        2. Jankowski likely gets non-tendered and takes a minor league deal from someone. I actually think there is a small chance they keep Quinn depending mainly on whether they think they can have him occupy a 40-man spot all winter. That would let them assess his rehab in March (where only about 1/6 of their arbitration award is guaranteed if they release him during the first part of Spring Training). Quinn’s arbitration number is so low that the Phillies might be tempted to take one more chance on him.

      1. You can find this scenario on most any club throughout baseball…

        Walker Buehler who pitched wonderful last night by the way avoided arb and is being paid 4.250 million.

  5. Clearing out all extraneous salary like Knapp and not re-signing Neris helps to change the oxygen in the clubhouse. Good guys and all, but Dombrowski needs to establish a winning mentality from the executive suites on down. Love the Kevin Long hire, especially if it draws Schwarber to the fold.

    1. Schwarber will come if we pay him the most money on a multi year deal but not for any other reason. I still think it will be Joc Pedersen in LF platooning with Vierling. But if the NL goes with the DH, Schwarber will get plenty of money and Philly will be in the mix.

      1. Yeah, DMAR…one of the Phillies organizational downfalls has is to get attached to likeable people who are unfortunately incompetent in their position. It’s one thing to take care of your people. It’s quite another to allow them to run the organization into the ground. Prime example is Monty instructing RAJ to trade away Cliff Lee after trading for Roy Halladay. Winning organizations don’t operate that way. I still wonder if the Phillies have completely come out of their small market mindset. Middleton certainly pressed against the old regime’s tendencies by pushing for (re)signing Lee the following winter, yet still for more than they would have had they not traded him in the first place. And it’s not a question of whether they are cheap or not…it’s about the inability of thinking outside the box. It’s the habitually “safe” acquisitions of has beens and journeymen who’ve jumped the shark or whose talents don’t translate under this environment. It’s hard to put one’s finger exactly on the reason but sustained organizational excellence seems to exceed its grasp. The bright side right now is that, like when they brought in Pat Gillick, Dave Dombrowski brings credibility and competence, two unicorns which eluded MacPhail and Klentak.

  6. Mark, it is my understanding that the Lee deal was still a Bill Giles decision. Monty took control sometime later, right before we got Lee back in FA. It remains one if the dumbest baseball decisions the team made. Not only was Lee only due $9M, the trade yielded nothing, was done in a hurry, and was a poor decision from the Major League and minor league level as it returned zero. We gave up more talent acquiring Roy Oswalt than we received by trading Lee.

  7. Yes, yes, yes, this doesn’t really matter, but I am confused by the “savings” on not picking up the options on Herrara and McCutcheon. Yes, I know that above it was clarified that the savings are: Declining the two options will save the team the $26,500,000 contracted for 2022, but is a real savings of the $30,350.000 the team was responsible for in 2021(with the buy out totals included). But, since by declining the options the buy outs (3,850,000) need to be paid, so mighten the “savings” actually be the $26,500,000 not the 30,350,000 ?

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